Writing Tips

Writing Tip: Allow Your Book To Evolve

When writing your book just know that your book WILL change.

Perhaps not a ton, perhaps only a little, or perhaps it will be a completely different book than the one you intended on writing in the first place, but one way or another, your book will evolve over time.

This isn’t a bad thing though. As you write, your ideas will grow and form. You might realize that what sounded like a great idea before doesn’t really work well in application. You may be hit with a sudden inspiration to go a different direction.

My advice?

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But in all seriousness, go for it! If you feel your book changing, you need to allow it. If you stick too tightly to your original plan, your writing will come out forced and it will sound that way to your readers. Take the new path and see where the new ideas lead you. If you hate them you can always go back and try again.

In other words, planning and outlining your book is important. But it is also just as important to allow your book to change and evolve as you write.

As you all know, I recently received my feedback from the publishers and they encouraged me to change and improve some chapters in my book. Through their suggestions, I have come up with new solutions and actually changed the entire chapter order of my book! And to be honest, it’s better for it!

Happy Writing Everyone!

***Enjoyed today’s tip? Check out my main page for more under the tab “Writing Tips”! Have any questions about today’s tip or writing in general? Leave your comments below!

 

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Writing Tips

Writing Tip: Don’t Edit, Rewrite Instead

This is a tip that I saw on Pinterest and so I thought I would give it a try a couple of months ago and I’m using this Tip currently on editing and expanding my book The Agency Games.

Here’s the idea: once you have finished drafting, you don’t just go into the computer and edit along the way. You pull up a blank document and you rewrite your manuscript sentence by sentence. Now before you turn away in disgust, hear me out.

This is why it works:
As you are rewriting your scholarly piece (as opposed to editing it), you will inherently take away any redundant parts but, more likely, you will add a lot more material and flush out your ideas now that you know how it ends. The same goes for fictional stories. In fictional stories, knowing where the characters are going will help you streamline your plot line within the novel. Going back and expanding where necessary and cutting out unnecessary scenes will greatly benefit your novel.

My results:
I am currently using this technique to expand my book. Out of six chapters, I have added 3,000 words! That’s pretty dang fantastic. It is HOURS (and days) of extra work and it is taking much longer than simple editing would have (which I’ll still have to do after I’m done rewriting).

However, the result is completely worth it. Not only did I greatly improve the quality of my writing but I also improved the quantity of my work. Despite the extra time that it takes, I fully plan to rewrite my entire book and hopefully reach my goal of 75,000 words!

Have you ever tried this technique before? Did it work for you?

Happy Writing Everyone!

***If you enjoyed today’s writing tip, be sure to visit my page “Writing Tips” on my main menu and learn more tips and tricks! Have any writing questions? Leave them in the comments below!

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Writing Tips

Writing Tip: When should you be revising/editing your work?

Revise/Edit AFTER Your First Complete Draft
So often I hear this question: “When should I revise my work? Should I be focused on editing the grammar and syntax as I go along? Should I edit after I finish a chapter? A scene? A paragraph? Within the sentence?”
First, let me say that different writers write and edit differently. However, I highly suggest that you do not edit AT ALL until your first draft is completed.
Editing IS important and this cannot be emphasized enough. However, trying to edit as you write can often be detrimental to your creative processes. When you are first writing it is important to simply write, to let the words go, and get the sentences out. When you first write, you do not want to be encumbered by thoughts of grammatical error or plot holes.
I am not saying that grammar and consistency are not important, they are, but not when you first start drafting. The point of the first draft is simply to create. Once you have finished the first draft, then it is time to go back and edit.
Therefore, once you have finished, I suggest editing chapter by chapter. Check and make sure every chapter has a fully developed arc and correct your grammar. After that, do a second revision to check that all of your chapters flow into one another and that the story is complete with no gaps.

Happy Writing Everyone!

***If you enjoyed today’s Writing Tip, be sure to check out other tips under the “Writing Tips” section on my home page!

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.