The Agency Games

The Manuscript Came In! Merry Christmas to Me!

As you probably read in my title, the official manuscript proofs for Agency in the Hunger Games came in last week and I could not be more excited! The manuscript proofs show me exactly what my book should look like in print. They are my last opportunity to read through the pages once again and double check for any typos or errors.

In addition to double checking for correctness, I am asked to create an Index for my book which sounds pretty straight forward, but I know will still take me quite some time. McFarland Publishing company has requested that I slowly, carefully, and meticulously double check through my book for errors and create this index, and return it by January 10th!

If you don’t hear from me (less than you do now), please know that I am here. I will simply be working diligently on my manuscript. Once I turn this manuscript back in, that will be my final submission for this book. After that, it is fully in the hands of the publishers and the next time I see my book, it will be a finished and polished copy that I can hold in my hands.

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Thank you for joining me over the past two years on this wonderful journey!

I cannot believe it is reaching its completion.

Writing Tips

Writing Tip: The 3-Drafts Rule

Today, I’m going to offer you some advice about how many drafts you should have before you consider sending out your full manuscript to a publishing company.

I consider the magic number to be 3: Three full-length drafts and let me tell you why.

Draft One: Getting it Down

Your very first draft should really be focused on just getting your writing out of your head and down on paper. In this draft, I encourage you to just write. Do not focus on getting it perfect, or saying everything you need to say. Create the bones of your manuscript. Or, in other words, consider it the road map for the rest of your drafts. This first draft is all about getting your words on paper and it will be messy, it will be disorganized, it will not be perfect. And guess what, it shouldn’t be.

Draft Two: Buffing it Out

After “completing” your first draft (meaning that the bones of your manuscript are present and arranged), it is time to start adding the “meat” (the muscles, sinews, and veins, etc.). Draft Two can be accomplished on your own or with a friend or writing colleague. I personally believe that it is beneficial to have outside opinion for this draft. What I do, is I send my Draft One to friends and receive BETA reader comments. What needs flushing out? What drags? What doesn’t make sense, etc.? Once I have their comments, I comb back through my first draft and begin addressing both their comments and add in my own. After this, you should have a completed, flushed out draft, but you’re not done yet.

Draft Three: Cleaning it Up

Once you have completed crafting your narrative (it has bones, and muscle, and skin), it’s time to make it pretty! If hardcore editing is not your thing, ask for outside help whether that means the family member who is an English major or paying for grammar edits. Trust me, nothing lowers the quality of a good book faster than bad grammar. This is your one chance to impress a publishing company, so spend some time (and maybe some money) improving your manuscript until it shines.

 

Well, there you have it: my three-draft rule!

What do you think? Is three drafts too many or too little? Be sure to comment below!

***Extra Tip: It is okay to have some time take place between Draft One and Draft Two, distance can be a good thing for your own writing! It can give you perspective.

 

Happy Writing Everyone!

***If you enjoyed today’s tip be sure to check out my Writing Tips section under the main menu for more great tips and tricks on how to improve your writing!

 

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Writing Tips

Writing Tip: Do the Research Before Submitting Your Manuscript/Proposal

Once you’ve finished writing your book (or maybe even just an outline), it’s understandable that you would be super excited. It’s normal that you would want to share this grand new idea with others. It’s not surprising that you would want to start sending out that manuscript/proposal/query letters ASAP to all sorts of publishing houses.
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But.
Let me take a moment to encourage you to do your research first. What does that mean?
First, do not find the biggest, baddest, most awesome publishing houses in the country and submit your manuscript without first looking through their submission requirements. Many publishing houses accept a variety of books, however, during certain months or time periods, they are only accepting specific genres. If you send in your fantasy book when they are only accepting horror novels, you can bet that manuscript will end up in the trash without a second glance. Also, when the publishing house gives very clear instructions how on the manuscript is to be sent in, be aware, those are NOT suggestions. They ARE requirements. You might have the world’s next best seller, but if you do not follow the rules, that manuscript once again ends up in the trash.
Second, there is nothing wrong with sending out your query letter/proposal/manuscript to various publishing houses at once, but don’t just send them everywhere without again checking in with the publishing houses. (In fact, some publishing houses request that you make them aware if you are sending your manuscript out to other houses). Look through their best sellers and what they are currently selling. This should give you an idea as to what that publishing house is looking for. If all they are currently publishing is non-fiction, they will not be interested in your book of poetry.
In other words, do the work. Put in the time and effort and research multiple publishing houses to enhance your chances of getting signed!

Happy Writing Everyone!

***If you enjoyed today’s writing tip, please be sure to stop by my page and click on “Writing Tips” in the top menu for more!

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.