Writing Tips

When Writer’s Block is Caused by Fear

Originally, I only intended to do five of these posts. As noted in the introductory blog “5 Reasons Behind Writer’s Block,” there are several reasons why writers are often prevented from writing. I had thought of five:

  • Lack of Time to Write
  • Sickness
  • Work
  • Lack of Creativity
  • Home Responsibilities

However, my friends and followers had pointed out that there is a sixth reason often responsible for writer’s block that I felt needed to be addressed. This is: FEAR.

The first step to overcoming Writer’s Block comes from the need to discover why the writer is blocked in the first place. Once you have establish the why you can work on how to move forward.

Fear = Small Goals & Courage

adult, black-and-white, bodySometimes we feel that we are defined by that empty, blank page. It stares at us and we stare back at it. For one reason or another, we are paralyzed, unable to commit words to paper. Why? According to both Mia and TShaw, fear is a major factor behind Writer’s Block. Mia says,

I think, why writer’s might suffer from writer’s block: fear. Fear of failure. Fear of success (yes, that’s a fairly common fear for writers, especially as most are very introverted). Fear of rejection. Fear of not being good enough.

Tshaw agreed, stating,

Fear that my writing is a waste of time.

Of course, both of these intelligent women were correct. Fear is a huge problem in a successful writing life! Perhaps it is ironic that the same week I am working on this post, my church spent an entire sermon focusing on courage. (You can read all about it here.)

In order to face our fears we must remember what courage is:

Courage is not the absence of fear, it is acting despite the presence of fear.

If you are feeling fearful, the best thing you can do is act regardless. Now, this is easier said than done which is why I suggest that you focus on small goals rather than large ones. When we fear rejection, or success, or failure, or really anything, the only way to fight that fear is to refuse to give it power. Sure, I could tell you to think positively, but that does not always work.

Truly, the only way to fight your fears successfully is to act in spite of them.

Happy Writing!

There you have it, the top 6 reasons why we suffer from “Writer’s Block” and ways to combat it! I hope you found this series both beneficial and entertaining!

What type of series would you like me to do next?

©KaylaAnnAuthor

© KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to KaylaAnn and KaylaAnnAuthor.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

22 thoughts on “When Writer’s Block is Caused by Fear”

  1. This is where I am. Fear, fear of I don’t know what I’m talking about. Fear of rejection, fear of not succeeding, and fear of succeeding. All the fears stated above. But I need time. I’m praying for a balance life between my full time job, blogging, and now writing. I need to push through it. 🙏🏼

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Fear is a big block for me as well, probably one of my biggest and it centers in my insecurity. I’ve gotten my fair share of rejections and insults, and they hurt, there’s no denying that, but I only give my insecurity power when I forget to push forward and move on.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks, I’ve been finding fear can be good up to point, helping things like the revision process, but there has to be that pivotal moment that your voice is your voice and if your speaking genuinely, honestly, the truth of it can’t be denied. Thanks, KaylaAnn!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve come to see writing as a constant, good journey of work, discovery, falls, get-ups and so forth. I think we’re always honing our craft.

    Next series: muses for writers? Writing environments? Writing styles?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dorinda, I consider you such a successful blogger and a beautiful poet! In an odd way, your fear is encouraging to me because if you are such a strong writer who stumbles with fear than it is okay if I stumble too!

      Like

  4. That was totally foreign to me.
    Your post definitely made me stop and think.
    Fear? Preventing me from writing? Naaaah…
    Wait a minute…
    And I noticed a rift. Between my blogging and my off-screen writing. Somehow I feel fearless about putting things out into the digital world. I think it’s because the blogging world is more forgiving. You can get feedback and then correct things.
    Whereas when it comes to putting SO much effort into writing a book and then not have people buy it/ enjoy it? THAT is where fear steps in.
    Interesting that we all struggle with different things in different ways, yet there can be lessons in each for all of us.
    Thanks for making me think about that.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sometimes when I’m in a scared, angry, or sad place, I write a poem about it on the notes section on my phone and keep that section locked. I write poems during these times because 1) they fit better in the notes section, and 2) they allow my feelings to come out without a lot of background, framing, or explanations. Most of mine just sit there, but are “out” which is a big step. Later, sometimes months or a year, I publish them. Sometimes I don’t. I have a few that I publish, yet mark private so only I can see them. This makes them feel concrete, yet still only within myself. I think of it more like therapy for me than information for someone else. It’s really a different form of writing for me but I find it helpful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love hearing your perspective on this topic Lahla. The idea of publishing to help make something “concrete” for example is an interesting one. Though, there is something comforting about the fact that we can still edit and improve our work (on WordPress at least).

      Liked by 1 person

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